• What is EMDR and How Does It Work?

    What is EMDR and How Does It Work?

    Perhaps you have heard of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) Therapy, but you are not sure what it is or how it works. This article will explain the theory behind EMDR and how it is used to treat a variety of mental health conditions.

    What is EMDR?

    Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) is a type of therapy that has been used to treat a variety of mental health conditions including, but not limited to, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, depression, panic attacks, traumatic grief/loss, and phobias. The therapy was developed in the late 1980s by psychologist Francine Shapiro, and has since gained widespread recognition as a highly effective form of treatment.

    For more information about EMDR at Coastal Teletherapy please visit our EMDR Service page: EMDR

    How does EMDR work?

    EMDR works by helping individuals process and overcome traumatic experiences. The therapy involves a structured eight-phase approach, which includes a combination of talk therapy and bilateral stimulation. This stimulation can be achieved through the use of eye movements, sounds, or physical touch.

    During an EMDR session, the therapist will guide the individual through a series of guided eye movements, sounds, or touch while they focus on a traumatic memory. This is what’s called bilateral stimulation. One of the main theories behind EMDR is that traumatic experiences can become “stuck” in the brain, preventing the individual from processing and overcoming them. By using bilateral stimulation, EMDR may help to activate the brain’s natural healing processes and promote the integration of traumatic memories into the individual’s overall life experience.

    Visit our service page for Trauma Therapy: Counseling for Trauma

    Is EMDR effective?

    EMDR is considered an evidence-based therapy and has been found to be effective in numerous clinical studies. The therapy has also gained widespread recognition among mental health professionals and is considered a leading treatment for PTSD and can be used to treat other conditions such as depression, anxiety, and grief/loss.

    It is important to note that EMDR is not a quick fix and may require multiple sessions to see significant progress. However, for individuals struggling with the after-effects of trauma, EMDR can be a powerful tool for healing and moving forward.

    Conclusion

    In conclusion, EMDR is a type of therapy that can help individuals process and overcome traumatic experiences.  EMDR can activate the brain’s natural healing processes and promote the integration of traumatic memories into the individual’s overall life experience. If you or someone you know is struggling with the after-effects of trauma, consider reaching out to a licensed therapist to learn more about EMDR and whether it may be a good fit for your specific needs.

    For additional articles about EMDR, visit our Blog page.

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